Archive for » May, 2014 «

Thursday, May 15th, 2014 | Author:

Tweakers.net, NU.nl and Kennislink.nl picked up the UT homepage news item on the research of my PhD student Mena Badieh Habib on Named Entity Extraction and Named Entity Disambiguation.
Tweakers.net: UT laat politiecomputers tweets ‘begrijpen’ voor veiligheid bij evenementen
NU.nl: Universiteit Twente laat computers beter begrijpend lezen
Kennislink.nl: Twentse computer leest beter

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014 | Author:

The news feed of the UT homepage features an item on the research of my PhD student Mena Badieh Habib.
Computers leren beter begrijpend lezen dankzij UT-onderzoek (in Dutch).
Mena defended his PhD thesis entitled “Named Entity Extraction and Disambiguation for Informal Text – The Missing Links on May 9th.

Friday, May 09th, 2014 | Author:

Today, a PhD student of mine, Mena Badieh Habib Morgan, defended his thesis.
Named Entity Extraction and Disambiguation for Informal Text – The Missing Link
Social media content represents a large portion of all textual content appearing on the Internet. These streams of user generated content (UGC) provide an opportunity and challenge for media analysts to analyze huge amount of new data and use them to infer and reason with new information. A main challenge of natural language is its ambiguity and vagueness. When we move to informal language widely used in social media, the language becomes even more ambiguous and thus more challenging for automatic understanding. Named Entity Extraction (NEE) is a sub task of Information Extraction (IE) that aims to locate phrases (mentions) in the text that represent names of entities such as persons, organizations or locations regardless of their type. Named Entity Disambiguation (NED) is the task of determining which correct person, place, event, etc. is referred to by a mention. The main goal of this thesis is to mimic the human way of recognition and disambiguation of named entities especially for domains that lack formal sentence structure. We propose a robust combined framework for NEE and NED in semi-formal and informal text. The achieved robustness has been proven to be valid across languages and domains and to be independent of the selected extraction and disambiguation techniques. It is also shown to be robust against shortness in labeled training data and against the informality of the used language.